Research Students

SMAH HDR Student Highlights Archive

Three Minute Thesis Competition

The 2016 Three Minute Thesis Competition for the Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health was held Thursday 9 June, with 7 HDR students competing. They were, Rhys Wyber – School of Biological Sciences, William ReyThnolds - School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Michael Macartney - School of Medicine, Thomas Simnadis - School of Medicine, Kathryn Gaskin - School of Medicine, Lisa Belfiore - School of Biological Sciences and Kelly Lambert - School of Medicine.  

The overall winner was Rhys Wyber for his presentation titled “LIFTing photosynthesis to new heights”.  The people’s choice winner was Thomas Simnadis for his presentation titled “Novel grains for the Australian food supply”.  The overall winner and people’s choice winner are both invited to represent SMAH at the UOW final on 6 July 2016.
Rhys Wyber and Thomas Simnadis
Rhys Wyber (left) and Thomas Simnadis

Why I love my PhD by Dr Jessica Bramley-Alves

The Guardian, Higher Education Network Monday, 29 February 2016
Jessica Bramley-Alves

Tracking FishTracking Fish

Conservation Research is vital in order to preserve habitats and species.

Career opportunities in marine ecology are vast, with jobs in a range of areas, from academia to government agencies like the Department of Primary Industries or non-government organisations like the Australian Conservation Foundation. Lachlan Fetterplace, a conservationist completing a PhD at the University of Wollongong with funding from the NSW Department of Primary Industries, is looking at marine park design and management by tracking fish in Jervis Bay Marine Park and along the south coast of NSW. 

Featured in Postgraduate Survival Guide, RiAus, Australia's Science Channel. 

3 Minute Thesis Contestants

Three Minute Thesis Competition

The 2015 Three Minute Thesis Competition for the Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health was held Thursday 11 June, with 9 HDR students competing. They were, Lisanne Spenkelink– School of Chemistry, Celeste Coltman - School of Medicine, Naomi Riggs – School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Miriam Coyle – School of Nursing, Jennifer Cohen – School of Medicine, Monica Birrento – School of Chemistry, Lauren Cole – School of Biology, Ryan Mantan – School of Earth and Environmental Sciences and Enrico Monachino – School of Chemistry

The overall winner was Monica Birrento for her presentation titled “Life, Death and Immortality”.  The people’s choice winner was Celeste Coltman for her presentation titled “Building better bras for real women”.  The overall winner and people’s choice winner are both invited to represent SMAH at the UOW final on 15 July 2015.

Our people’s choice winner will be attending a conference overseas at the time of the final so our runner up Lisanne Spenkelink from the School of Chemistry will be representing SMAH.  Her presentation title was “Zooming in:  DNA replication”.

Indonesian Cave Art
PhD student’s Nature publication reveals some of earliest human art

Thomas Sutikna, who is completing a PhD in SMAH’s School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, is part of a team of Indonesian and Australian scientists who have dated some of the world’s earliest known cave art on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi, challenging the commonly held view that Europeans were the first to produce rock art.

The paper, Pleistocene cave art from Sulawesi, Indonesia, was published in the prestigious journal Nature on 8 October, 2014 and is co-author by SMAH researchers Dr Anthony Dosseto and the late Prof. Mike Morwood.

The team dated 12 hand stencils and two figurative animal depictions at seven cave sites in the limestone ‘tower karst’ of southwest Sulawesi, with the earliest image (a hand stencil) being at least 40,000 years old.

Thomas Sutikna said the finding suggests that figurative art may have been part of the cultural repertoire of his ancient Indonesian ancestors – the first modern human populations to reach this region more than 40,000 years ago. 

 “Rock art is one of the first indicators of an abstract mind – the onset of being human as we know it,” Thomas Sutikna said.

Last reviewed: 2 November, 2017